• The Things They Carried Reader Guide

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 2/16/2016 7:00:00 AM

    We are going to begin reading Tim O'Brien's book The Things They Carried this week. This reader's guide, provided by the NEA's Big Read program, has, among other things, a lot of good background information about Tim O'Brien and the Vietnam War. You can download the file here: The Things They Carried Reader's Guide

    Also, here's a link the Big Read's website for The Things They Carried.

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  • Tone Words

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 2/16/2016 7:00:00 AM

    Our vocabulary for the next few weeks will focus on tone words to better help you describe what you read in The Things They Carried. I will post the specific definitions that we will be focusing on in Quizlet, but if you want to get a jump start on the definitions, you can find them here: Huge List of Tone Words.

    You can also find this list online at: http://www.mhasd.k12.wi.us/cms/lib04/WI01001388/Centricity/Domain/123/Huge_list_of_tone_words_with_definitions.pdf

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  • Persuasive Essay Rubric

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 2/11/2016 7:00:00 AM

    You can download the rubric for your persuasive essay here: Persuasive Essay Rubric

    CATEGORY

    Excellent

    Above Average

    Average

    Poor

    Organization

    The introduction is inviting, states the thesis, and provides an overview of the issue. Information is presented in a logical order and maintains the interest of the audience. The conclusion strongly states a personal opinion.

    The introduction is inviting, states the thesis, and provides an overview of the issue. Information is presented in a logical order and but does not always maintain the interest of the audience. The conclusion states a personal opinion.

    The introduction includes the thesis. Most information is presented in a logical order. A conclusion is included, but does not clearly state a personal opinion.

    There is no clear introduction, structure or conclusion

    Thesis

    There is one thesis that is debatable and specific and strongly and clearly identifies the issue.

    There is one thesis that is debatable and identifies the issue

    The thesis is not debatable, and a personal opinion is not clearly stated. There is little reference to the issue

    The thesis is not debatable, and the personal opinion is not clearly understood. There is little or no reference to the issue.

    Required Elements:

    Ethos, logos, pathos, counterargument and rebuttal.

    The paper includes all required elements and are organized in a clear and logical way

    All required elements are included in the paper and are organized in a generally logical way.

    All but 1 of the required elements are included in the paper. The paper is not organized in a logical way.

    Several required elements were missing. The paper is not organized in a logical way.

    Evidence

    There are three or more pieces of evidence that strongly and clearly support the thesis. It is evident that a lot of thought went into the assignment.

    There are three or more pieces of evidence are stated, but the evidence doesn’t always clearly support the thesis.

    Two pieces of evidence are used, but with weak arguments.

    Evidence is weak or missing. Less than two pieces of evidence are used.

    Attention to Audience

    Argument demonstrates a clear understanding of the potential audience and clearly anticipates strong counterarguments.

    Argument demonstrates a clear understanding of the potential audience and anticipates counterarguments

    Argument demonstrates some understanding of the potential audience. A counterargument may be present

    Argument does not target the audience. No counterargument is present.

    Grammar, Mechanics, and Spelling

    There may be a few minor errors in grammar, mechanics and spelling, but it does not interfere with understanding

    There are some errors in grammar, mechanics, and spelling, but they generally do not interfere with understanding.

    There are several errors in grammar, mechanics, and spelling.

    There are numerous errors in grammar, mechanics, and spelling.

     

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  • MLA Formatting

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 2/4/2016 7:00:00 AM

    If you need help formatting your paper according to MLA guidelines, the Purdue OWL provides the guidelines you need to use to format your paper correctly. I've also included a YouTube video that shows you how to format the paper in Microsoft Word and another one that shows you how to do this in Google Docs. 

    Purdue OWL MLA Guidelines: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/

    Formatting a paper in Word: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Qf8AfiCcD4&feature=youtu.be

    Formatting a paper in Google Docs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_RovUSe2eY

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  • Counterargument Editorial In Class Exercise

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 1/28/2016

    As a class, look at these excerpts from two of last year’s Student Editorial Contest WinnersStop ‘I Spy’ Game With Allies and The War on Drugs. We will go over these in class on Thursday January 28 and Friday January 29

    Excerpt 1: Editorial Contest Winner | Stop ‘I Spy’ Game With Allies

    The N.S.A. is overreaching its duties. While President Obama and officials assured Americans that the N.S.A.’s only purpose for surveillance is to prevent another terrorist attack (despite a panel commissioned by Obama himself that flatly noted surveillance was not essential for the N.S.A.’s purpose), the N.S.A. also eavesdrops on diplomatic communications of friends for an advantage in negotiations and policy making which does not contribute to their dubious claims of protecting national security.

    R. James Woolsey, a former director of the C.I.A., writes in his Wall Street Journal article, “Why We Spy on Allies,” that we wouldn’t need to spy on Europeans if they would reform their economic policies and stop bribing. Sure, it’d be nice for someone to police their unethical behavior to save themselves and possibly even out the competition for ourselves. But at a time when Americans are largely opposed to foreign interference (look at how people responded to military action in Syria), these actions taken by the N.S.A. are unwarranted and do not represent our interests.

    Finally, the N.S.A.’s shrug-off excuse, “Everybody else does it, why can’t we?”, relies on the reasoning of Hammurabi’s Code of an “eye for an eye.” They’re spying on us, so we’re spying on them. However, an eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind. In this case, this constant back and forth spying is meaningless, derailing the N.S.A. from the primary goal to fight terrorism at the expense of resources and tax dollars.

    Excerpt 2: Editorial Contest Winner | The War on Drugs

    The drug war is failing for the same reason that prohibition did in the 1920s. Supply for alcohol was cut, while the demand still existed. This gave power to criminals who were willing to break the law to supply alcohol and make quick money. This is more true now than it was in the 1920s. Because of a more globalized economy, better-established and more easily accessible trade routes, smuggling drugs into the country is easier than ever for cartels. The flawed logic here is that the drug war is something that can be won: If enough shipments are confiscated, or enough dealers are busted, the supply will end and drug abuse will cease to exist. Even if tomorrow, the head of the largest cartel was taken into custody, it wouldn’t make any difference. As long as demand exists from the United States for illegal drugs, there will always be someone willing to supply it.

    After reading:

    Together, note on the board the strategies each writer uses to introduce counterarguments and then how they turn back to their own positions. You might create a two-column chart on the board, in the style of “They Say, I Say,” in which you write down the exact words used to introduce the counterargument in the left-hand column (“So and so says….”) and the language used to reassert the writers position in the right-hand one (for example, “The flawed logic here is….”). This gives students a template for how to finesse counterarguments in their own writing and gives them a framework for thinking in this way. Ask students: What difference does the presence of a counterargument make for you as a reader? Does it make the writer’s position stronger? How?

     

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  • Counterarguments Presentation

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 1/26/2016 7:30:00 AM

    Here is a link to the presentation on counterarguments that I'll be going over in class on Tuesday, January 26 and Wednesday, January 27: http://prezi.com/xs52bh4ruwi6/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

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  • Rhetorical Appeals Presentation

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 1/25/2016 7:00:00 AM

    This is the Prezi assignment about the rhetorical appeals that we went over in class last week: http://prezi.com/_wwzju6-v64x/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

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  • Martin Luther King's I Have a Dream Speech

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 1/14/2016 8:10:00 AM

    You can download MLK's speech here: I Have a Dream

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  • Persuasive Thesis Statements

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 1/11/2016 8:30:00 AM

    If you missed class on Monday or Tuesday, or you would like to review the powerpoint about persuasive thesis statements, you can find the powerpoint here: Persuasive Thesis Statements Powerpoint

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  • How To Submit Your Rhetorical Analysis Essay

    Posted by Barbi Fowler on 12/17/2015

    You will submit your essays electronically through Google Drive. Your essay MUST BE TYPED and it must follow MLA formatting guidelines. For a video that walks you through formatting your paper, see the Resources section of my webpage.

     

    To submit your paper.

    1. Go to Google Drive. The address is www.google.com
    2. You need to log in using your school email address. If you already have a gmail account, log out of that account and log into your school email.
      1. Email: firstname.lastname@dvilleschools.org (ex: smith@dvilleschools.org)
      2. Password: You will use the same password you use to log into the computers and laptops on campus.
    3. Once you have logged into your drive, look in the right hand column and click on Shared With Me. You will see that a folder titled Rhetorical Analysis Essay. I have already added you to the folder. Click on the folder.
    4. To upload your paper, click the red button at the top that says New. A dropdown menu will appear.
    5. Choose the file upload option. Find your file, highlight it, and click the open button, and your file will be uploaded.

    Note: You need to upload your paper to this folder.

    If and only if you’re having problems, share the file with me or send it to me via email. I will accept it, but I will take 3 points off your paper grade. This should only be a last resort if you are unable to upload your paper.

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